We use cookies to optimize our website and our services. Refer here for privacy statement. Here for Cookie policy.

USAF B-1B fleet grounded again due to issues with ejection seat

The issue is believed to be unrelated to a problem with ejection seat (egress) components that forced a B-1 from Dyess AFB to make an emergency landing in Midland on May 1.

On Mar. 28, 2019, the U.S. Air Force (USAF) has grounded the B-1 bomber fleet due to issues with the ejection seat.

“During a routine inspection of the B-1B drogue chute system, potentially fleet-wide issues were identified with the rigging of the drogue chute. As a precautionary measure, the commander directed a holistic inspection of the entire egress system,” according to the Air Force Global Strike Command.

The drogue chute is the first parachute that deploys when the pilot or crew member ejects.

The commander of Global Strike Command — which is located at Barksdale Air Force Base (AFB) in Louisiana — ordered a safety stand-down of the B-1B Lancer fleet.

The safety stand-down will afford maintenance and Aircrew Flight Equipment technicians the necessary time to thoroughly inspect each aircraft. As these inspections are completed and any issues are resolved, aircraft will return to flight.

Noteworthy this is the second time that the USAF grounds the entire fleet of B-1 bombers in less than a year.

However the issue is believed to be unrelated to a problem with ejection seat (egress) components that forced a B-1 from Dyess AFB to make an emergency landing in Midland on May 1.

The fleet was grounded on June 7. The safety stand-down was lifted June 19.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. B-1B Lancer 28th FW, 34th BS Thunderbirds, EL/86-129 / 2005

Photo credit: U.S. Air Force

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com

Related posts

Ball Unveils Sled Driver Watch Honoring Legendary SR-71 Blackbird pilot Brian Shul

“USAF will reduce its fighter inventory from seven fleets to four, and the F-22 Raptor is not on the service short list,” Air Force Chief of Staff said

The RAF Buccaneer attack aircraft that performed a record-breaking short flight of 92 seconds

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Read More