Learn some facts about F-35 Gen III helmet, the ground-breaking helmet that lets pilots see through the aircraft

WATCH THIS VIDEO AND LEARN SOME FACTS ABOUT F-35 GEN III HELMET, THE GROUND-BREAKING HELMET THAT LETS PILOTS SEE THROUGH THE AIRCRAFT

By Dario Leone
Nov 26 2017
Share this article

The F-35 Gen III Helmet Mounted Display System is a vital element of the F-35 Lightning II’s unprecedented warfighter capability

The F-35 is full of cutting-edge technology.

As the video in this post explains one piece of that technology is the Generation III Helmet, which lets pilots see through the aircraft.

Actually the Rockwell Collins F-35 Generation III Helmet Mounted Display System (HMDS), known as F-35 Gen III helmet, is a vital element of the F-35 Lightning II’s unprecedented warfighter capability.

The helmet’s ground-breaking technology equips the pilot with mission-critical information on the helmet’s visor; resolves well-documented fit, comfort, and convenience problems associated with helmets worn by pilots of legacy aircraft; and fuses together the Joint Strike Fighter’s cutting edge communications and sensor suite to form a clear picture of the operating environment — giving F-35 pilots unrivaled situational awareness and a decisive advantage over adversaries.

F-35A print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. F-35A Lighning II 56th OG, 61st FS, LF/12-5050 / 2014

Built with its own Display Management Computer Hardware operating system the helmet enables pilots to toggle through different modes of data visualization. It also delivers a more efficient video feed than the F-35’s Gen II helmets — equipping pilots with symbology correlated inside the cockpit as well as outside the aircraft with the use of the Distributed Aperture System (DAS). Using multiple DAS cameras installed peripherally around the aircraft, the F-35 driver can display various modes of imagery such as thermal, night vision, and actual and achieve an unprecedented look-through-aircraft capability. All modes are beneficial to pilots as they deliver a clear 360-degree picture during daylight and lowlight settings. Thermal images portrayed through DAS enable pilots to view heat signatures emitted by various objects. For instance, a pilot can identify a ship running a hot engine against the vast darkness of the cold ocean. Night vision can also assist in magnifying low visibility objects against areas of very little to no light.

Photo credit: U.S. Marine Corps

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com


Share this article

Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

Leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share this article


Share this article
Share this article

Always up to date! News and offers delivered directly to you!

Get the best aviation news, stories and features from The Aviation Geek Club in our newsletter, delivered straight to your inbox.



    Share this article
    Back to top