USAF A-10 Warthog CAS aircraft getting the Common Open Secure Mission Computer to enhance air dominance and improve sustainability

USAF A-10 Warthog CAS aircraft getting the Common Open Secure Mission Computer to enhance air dominance and improve sustainability

By Dario Leone
Jun 20 2022
Share this article

The USAF will swap the A-10 Warthog mission computer with a new one from Raytheon Intelligence & Space.

The US Air Force (USAF) will swap the A-10 Warthog mission computer with a new one from Raytheon Intelligence & Space.

In fact Raytheon Intelligence & Space, a Raytheon Technologies business, was selected to receive a $46.2 million firm-fixed-price Project-Level Agreement under the SOSSEC Consortium’s AFLCMC Consortium Initiative OTA from the USAF to replace the A-10C Thunderbolt II mission computer with RI&S’ Common Open Secure Mission Computer, COSMC, modernized processing for combat systems control to enhance air dominance and improve sustainability.

The A-10 Central Interface Control System program will replace the current mission computer and weapons stores management system, fully modernizing the Operational Flight Program software environment and establishing COSMC as the new central computer for the A-10. RI&S has partnered with Non-Traditional Defense Contractors including Apogee Worx, CymSTAR, KIHOMAC and Vertex because of their extensive knowledge and experience of the A-10.

“Our COSMC system is a significant technological leap forward for the A-10,” said Denis Donohue, president, Communications and Airspace Management Systems, RI&S, in a company news release. “This platform-agnostic system delivers the generational refresh required for the Warthog to remain highly capable into the future. We look forward to transforming and reinvigorating our customers’ platforms so that they’re equipped to face any mission, any challenge.”

Davis Monthan A-10C Print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. A-10C Thunderbolt II 355th FW, 354th FS Bulldogs, FS/82-684. Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ – 2015

COSMC is a platform-agnostic mission computer, built upon COTS, that can be used on any aircraft, fixed wing, rotary, unmanned to enable multi-mission management, weapon stores and sensor processing, among other things.

This award is for Phase 1 of a multi-phase prototype project followed by a potential award for production and installation on A-10C aircraft. The primary work locations for this effort are in McKinney, Texas and Layton, Utah.

The venerable A-10 Thunderbolt II, dubbed Warthog for its unglamorous appearance, came into the Air Force inventory in 1975 and no one guessed that it would still be a valuable asset in 2022. With several upgrades through the years, it’s one tough fighter as the Warthog can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high explosive projectiles up to 23mm and fly when hydraulic power is lost. Known as the “tank buster”, the Thunderbolt has contributed in many military operations including Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

The following video gives an overview of COSMC, the platform-agnostic mission computer that can be used on any aircraft, fixed wing, rotary, unmanned, or wide-body wing developed by Raytheon Intelligence & Space.

Fairchild A-10 Thunderbolt II model
This model is available from AirModels! CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS.

Photo credit: U.S. Air Force


Share this article

Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

Leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share this article


Share this article
Share this article

Always up to date! News and offers delivered directly to you!

Get the best aviation news, stories and features from The Aviation Geek Club in our newsletter, delivered straight to your inbox.



    Share this article
    Back to top