Home Helicopters Two US Service Members Killed in AH-64D Apache attack Helicopter Crash in Afghanistan

Two US Service Members Killed in AH-64D Apache attack Helicopter Crash in Afghanistan

by Dario Leone
"Each Army National Guard Apache battalion needs to borrow six AH-64s to go to war," NGAUS president says

First reports mentioned that the rotors of the AH-64D Apache clipped a mountain ridge in Logar Province (east Afghanistan).

The two crew members of a US Army AH-64D attack helicopter were killed after their Apache crashed in Afghanistan, US the Department of Defense told on Nov. 20, 2019.

“The cause of the crash is under investigation, however preliminary reports do not indicate it was caused by enemy fire,” Resolute Support said in a statement.

However, the US DOD said there are no indications that the US Army helicopter crashed due to enemy fire. First reports in fact mentioned that the rotors of the Apache clipped a mountain ridge in Logar Province (east Afghanistan).

Initially the Taliban claimed to have shot down a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in Logar province in the east of the country.

“The Taliban statement is false … there is no indication at this time the helicopter was shot down,” a Resolute Support spokesperson told The Defense Post.

The U.S. operates a number of helicopters in Afghanistan, including the Chinook, the AH-64 Apache and UH-60 Black Hawk.

The service members’ names are being held until 24 hours after their next of kin are notified, in accordance with U.S. Defense Department policy.

Noteworthy the latest accident involving a US Army helicopter in Afghanistan before the AH-64D crash that happened on Nov. 20, took place in the night between May 24 and 25, when a CH-47F Chinook was completely destroyed after a crash-landing in Helmand province.

Passengers and crew aboard the helicopter were injured and the Chinook had been totally destroyed during the landing.

“Both Afghan and US personnel were injured,” Colonel David Butler, a spokesman for US Forces Afghanistan, said. “No hostile fire or enemy contact involved.”

Photo credit: U.S. Army

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