The story of the SR-71(Bx), the supercruising strike aircraft version of the Blackbird armed with AGM-69A SRAM missiles into the chines

The story of the SR-71(Bx), the supercruising strike aircraft version of the Blackbird armed with AGM-69A SRAM missiles into the chines

By Dario Leone
Jul 29 2023
Sponsored by: Mortons Books
Share this article

In 1976 Ben Rich of the Lockheed Skunk Works delivered a paper that briefly described the `Bx’, a straightforward modification of the existing SR-71 Blackbird into a supercruising strike aircraft.

The SR-71, unofficially known as the “Blackbird,” is a long-range, advanced, strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft. The first flight of an SR-71 took place on Dec. 22, 1964, and the first SR-71 to enter service was delivered to the 4200th (later 9th) Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., in January 1966. The US Air Force (USAF) retired its fleet of SR-71s on Jan. 26, 1990.

Throughout its nearly 24-year career, the SR-71 remained the world’s fastest and highest-flying operational aircraft. From 80,000 feet, it could survey 100,000 square miles of Earth’s surface per hour.

The story of the SR-71(Bx), the supercruising strike aircraft version of the Blackbird armed with AGM-69A SRAM missiles into the chines

As told by Scott Lowther in the book Origins and Evolution Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, in 1976 Ben Rich of the Lockheed Skunk Works delivered a paper that briefly described the `Bx’, a straightforward modification of the existing SR-71 into a supercruising strike aircraft. This would be pe accomplished by putting AGM-69A SRAM missiles into the chines… not quite into the existing equipment bays, but rather into new longer bays in approximately the same positions.

The available diagram of the SR-71(Bx) is distressingly low resolution and has a few internal contradictions, but it appears that the forward fuselage of the aircraft would be ‘bent’ upwards along with having the blunter chines and the rounded underside to provide sufficient clearance for the missiles. The aircraft would have been fitted with a dedicated radar, though it’s difficult to make out the details; the nose would be recontoured and slightly lengthened to accommodate.

SR-71 print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. SR-71A Blackbird 61-7972 “Skunkworks”

Further data on the SR-71(Bx) is lean; how rigorous the design effort for the SR-71(Bx) was is unclear. But by launching at Mach 3.2 and at an altitude of 80,000ft, the range of the SRAM could be notably increased to around 500 nautical miles. As the SRAM was not a guided missile, accuracy was not spectacular… Circular error probability (CEP) at 300 nautical miles was 3600ft. Rich suggested that CEP could be cut in half with terminal guidance, but details on that were not given.

Origins and Evolution Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird is published by Mortons Books and is available to order here.

Photo credit: U.S. Air Force and Scott Lowther via Mortons Books

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird model
This model is available in multiple sizes from AirModels – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS.

Share this article

Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.
Mortons new banner

Leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments

  1. Kenneth Johnson says:

    The Air Force should reinstate the SR-71 with modified weapons and electronics to fight China North Korea Russia Ken1943

Share this article


Share this article
Share this article

Always up to date! News and offers delivered directly to you!

Get the best aviation news, stories and features from The Aviation Geek Club in our newsletter, delivered straight to your inbox.



    Share this article
    Back to top
    My Agile Privacy
    This website uses technical and profiling cookies. Clicking on "Accept" authorises all profiling cookies. Clicking on "Refuse" or the X will refuse all profiling cookies. By clicking on "Customise" you can select which profiling cookies to activate. We and our selected ad partners can store and/or access information on your device, such as cookies, unique identifiers, browsing data. You can always choose the specific purposes related to profiling by accessing the advertising preferences panel, and you can always withdraw your consent at any time by clicking on "Manage consent" at the bottom of the page.

    List of some possible advertising permissions:

    You can consult: our list of advertising partners, the Cookie Policy and the Privacy Policy.
    Warning: some page functionalities could not work due to your privacy choices