Losses and Aviation Safety

INTERESTING PHOTOS SHOW C-5 GALAXY AIRLIFTERS FLYING WITH ONLY THREE ENGINES

Trick Or Treat C-5 Galaxy flights.

Appeared on Code One Magazine, the main image of the article features a C-5, flying with only three engines, landing at Dobbins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, on May 25, 1977, after flying from Travis AFB, California. On a prior flight, the aircraft (Air Force serial number 66-8306) suffered an inflight emergency that destroyed the left inboard engine and damaged the pylon. After landing safely, the engine was removed and the pylon temporarily faired over to reduce drag. The Galaxy was approved for a one-time, three-engine flight across the country for permanent repairs. This C-5A, the fourth Galaxy built, was initially part of the flight test fleet. It was last assigned to Kelly AFB, Texas, and was retired in February 2004 with 14,518 flight hours.

The second photo (which appeared on Code One too) instead shows a C-5, flying with only three engines, landing at Dobbins AFB, Georgia, on Jun. 29, 1979 after flying from Dover AFB, Delaware. In November 1978, this aircraft (Air Force serial number 70-0450) suffered a low pressure turbine failure that destroyed the left outboard engine and damaged the pylon. After landing safely, the engine was removed and the pylon temporarily faired over to reduce drag. The Galaxy was approved for a one-time, three-engine flight to Marietta for permanent repairs. This C-5A, the sixty-fourth Galaxy built, was last assigned to Altus AFB, Oklahoma, and was retired in April 2004 with 16,165 flight hours.

For decades, the C-5 has been a pivotal air mobility asset, responsible for the rapid deployment of combat forces to any point in the world at short notice. Since its introduction the aircraft seen extensive use in every major global contingency since the Southeast Asia War.

In fact the C-5’s range and cargo capacity greatly exceeded the capabilities of earlier USAF airlifters. The massive cargo hold measured 120 feet long, nearly 20 feet wide, and 13 feet tall.

In a standard configuration it can carry 36 pallets of equipment and 81 troops. The C-5 is also used to transport special oversize loads and can accommodate two Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles or a variety of heavy combat equipment, including two M1 Abrams main battle tanks or three CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

Specially designed for heavy airlift, the C-5’s large front and rear cargo doors reduce cargo transfer times by allowing ground crews to load and off-load the aircraft simultaneously. An innovative “kneeling” landing gear system facilitates vehicle loading and eliminates the need for special lift equipment. The C-5’s “high flotation” landing gear permits the aircraft to operate from smaller, unsurfaced airfields despite its great size and weight, allowing for forward delivery of troops and equipment.

Based on a study showing 80 percent of the C-5 airframe service life remaining, Air Mobility Command (AMC) began an aggressive program to modernize its fleet C-5A/B/Cs in 1998.

The updated version of the Galaxy is called C-5M.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. C-5M Super Galaxy 60th Air Mobility Wing, 349th Air Mobility Wing, 22nd Airlift Squadron, 07-0042 – Travis AFB, CA.

Photo credit: Lockheed Martin

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com

Source: National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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