Home Military Aviation Impressive video shows C-5M Super Galaxy Taking Off from Prestwick Airport in a Stunning Wall of Water

Impressive video shows C-5M Super Galaxy Taking Off from Prestwick Airport in a Stunning Wall of Water

by Dario Leone
Impressive video shows C-5M Super Galaxy Taking Off from Prestwick Airport in a Stunning Wall of Water

The impressive video in this post features a USAF C-5M Super Galaxy departing Prestwick airport in a stunning wall of water.

Filmed by Rob Brown on Friday Feb. 28, 2020, the impressive video in this post features a U.S. Air Force (USAF) C-5M Super Galaxy (84-0060 from Travis Air Force Base) departing Prestwick airport in a stunning wall of water.

As the clip shows, the weather on that day was terrible with almost biblical rainfall which made conditions challenging to say the least. The C-5M arrived at Prestwick the previous day and night stopped before departing back stateside.

The Super Galaxy is equipped with five sets of landing gear, 28 wheels, four General Electric CF6-80C2-L1F (F-138) commercial engines, and a state-of-the-art maintenance diagnostics system. It can carry oversized cargo over intercontinental ranges and can take off and land on relatively short runways.

Impressive video shows C-5M Super Galaxy Taking Off from Prestwick Airport in a Stunning Wall of Water
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. C-5M Super Galaxy 60th Air Mobility Wing, 349th Air Mobility Wing, 22nd Airlift Squadron, 07-0042 – Travis AFB, CA

Both the nose and aft doors open, allowing ground crews to simultaneously load and off-load cargo from both ends, reducing cargo transfer times. The full-width drive-on ramps at each end enable double rows of vehicles to be transported.

The maintenance diagnostics system has the ability to record and analyze data from more than 7,000 test points, reducing maintenance and repair time.

The C-5M, with a cargo load of 281,001 pounds (127,460 kilograms), can fly 2,150 nautical miles, offload, and fly to a second base 500 nautical miles away from the original destination — all without aerial refueling. With aerial refueling, the aircraft’s range is limited only by crew endurance.

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Welcome to The Aviation Geek Club, your new stopover aviation place. Launched in 2016 by Dario Leone, an Italian lifelong - aviation geek, this blog is the right place where you can share your passion and meet other aviation enthusiasts from all over the world.

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