Aviation History

HERE’S WHY THE F-105 WAS DUBBED THE “THUD”

Whether it was the sound of 50,000 pounds of metal uncontrollably impacting the earth, or the light-hearted shortening of the name Howdy Doody’s Indian rival, Chief Thunderthud, the F-105 became known affectionately as the “Thud” by those who flew and maintained it

In 1951 Republic Aviation began a project to develop a supersonic tactical fighter-bomber to replace the F-84F. The result was the F-105 Thunderchief, later affectionately nicknamed the “Thud.” The prototype YF-105A first flew in October 1955, but the first F-105D did not fly until June 1959. A total of 833 Thunderchiefs of all types were built, including 610 F-105Ds.

Noteworthy the “D” variant could carry the entire 12,000-pound weapons load externally, giving the chance to use the internal bomb bay of the aircraft for fuel. This feature gave the F-105D the ability to take off with a full ordnance and minimum fuel load, refuel in the air, and take the maximum payload to the target.

But despite this unique feature, there was talk about canceling the F-105D program because of several groundings of the fleet following engines problems that resulted in two fatal accidents.

According to Ted Spitzmiller book Century Series, The USAF Quest Air Supremacy 1950-1960, as had occurred with previous F-105 models, production blocks resulted in configuration differences that caused issues with maintenance procedures and spares ordering. Actually problems with routing and securing the miles of wiring along with hydraulic and fuel lines resulted in chafing which eventually caused shorts and leaks that brought to high maintenance ans several accidents. Given these issues a standardization program called “Project Look-Alike” was undertaken between 1962 and 1964 to inspect these systems.

Furthermore it was decided to address the problem of water gaining entry into various nooks and crannies and creating serious electronic failures and other maintenance problems. Noteworthy this issue came to light during Europe deployments where seasonal weather was much more severe. However after access panels were released and the aircraft were painted with a silver lacquer to seas as much of the plane as possible the failures decreased.

Another constant problem was overheating in the afterburner (AB) area of the fuselage. This issue was addressed by adding two additional air intakes on either side of the aft fuselage to provide more cooling from outside air.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. F-105F Thunderchief “Sinister Vampire” – Wild Weasel 50th Anniversary, 2015

Howard Plunkett, author of the book F-105 Thunderchiefs: A 29-Year Illustrated Operational History, with Individual Accounts of the 103 Surviving Fighter Bombers, says: “A ‘constant problem’ is a bit understated. Fuel leaks and overheating caused explosions and aircraft losses. Safety Pack II was the mod that installed the cooling scoops on the left fuselage (among other things) during March – July 1965. It was probably the most significant mod to the F-105 and fixed the problem in time for combat deployments that year.”

Given all these problems the projected production of 1,500 aircraft would be dramatically scaled back.

Eventually as told by Spitzmiller, while the name Thunderchief was appealing to Republic and its PR department, those who flew this heaviest fighter of its time, with a wing loading that guaranteed a high descent rate when the engine faltered… applied another name. Whether it was the sound of 50,000 pounds of metal uncontrollably impacting the earth, or the light-hearted shortening of the name Howdy Doody’s Indian rival, Chief Thunderthud, the F-105 became known affectionately as the “Thud” by those who flew and maintained it.

Photo credit: U.S. Air Force

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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