Drones

General Atomics MQ-25 design completes arresting hook testing

General Atomics MQ-25’s arresting hook will be supplied by GKN Aerospace’s Fokker business unit

On Jul. 23, 2018 General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) announced that it has concluded performance testing of the arresting hook Hold Down Damper (HDD) for its proposed MQ-25 unmanned aerial refueling aircraft for the U.S. Navy.

The arresting hook will be supplied by GKN Aerospace’s Fokker business unit.

The test simulated dynamic conditions providing performance characteristics of the HDD, such as damping, spring rate and pressure control functionality. The test results validate modeling tools that provide quick reaction capability for completing the design and manufacturing during the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) contract.

“The tests successfully validated the dynamic simulation model for our HDD for MQ-25,” said David R. Alexander, president, Aircraft Systems, GA-ASI. “The validation of this model gives us confidence ahead of production and eventual deployment. This is part of our ongoing effort to reduce risk and accelerate capability for the Navy.”

The model verified key requirements for HDD performance testing with positive results for initial bounce, upswing and rebound, and bolter at nominal, cold, and hot operational temperatures. The preliminary design also validated construction and manufacturing methods for production use. Validation of damper modeling and construction methods in this test mitigates technical risks and met the goal of reducing the development schedule and cost of arresting hook during the MQ-25 program’s pending EMD phase.

The MQ-25 Stingray unmanned carrier aviation air system (UCAAS), formerly the Carrier-Based Aerial-Refueling System (CBARS), is a planned unmanned combat aerial system (UCAS) that resulted from the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike program.

Photo credit: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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