First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War

First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War

By Dario Leone
Jun 29 2022
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This ‘What if’ design pulls cues from the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War, and a similar experimental livery of camouflage that was tested at that time.

The 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron at Luke Air Force Base (AFB), Arizona, unveiled an F-16D Fighting Falcon painted in a heritage color scheme at the 310th Air Maintenance Unit hangar on Jun. 17, 2022. As explained by Senior Airman Caleb F. Butler in the article Luke AFB Unveils Newest Heritage Jet, this particular jet was the first American F-16 to score an aerial victory.

First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War
Members of the fabrication flight’s corrosion control team stand with their newly painted F-16D Fighting Falcon during an unveiling ceremony at the 310th Air Maintenance Unit hangar Jun. 17, 2022, at Luke Air Force Base Phoenix, Arizona. This F-16 was painted in a heritige design as a means of honoring Lt. Col. Gary “Nordo” North’s actions during a routine Operation Southern Watch mission in Iraq and Air Force heritage. The paint job required 1,500 man-hours and over 13 gallons of paint.

“The aircraft before you earned the moniker ‘MiG Killer’ as a result of the events that took place on Dec. 27, 1992.” said 1st Lt. James Mobbley, 56th EMS Fabrication Flight officer in charge, at the unveiling ceremony. “On this day, Lt. Col. Gary “Nordo” North, who was flying this F-16D, tail number 0778, led a flight of four F-16s on a routine Operation Southern Watch mission in Iraq.”

During this mission, an armed MiG-25 Foxbat entered into the no-fly zone.

First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War
An F-16D Fighting Falcon sits on display during an unveiling ceremony at the 310th Air Maintenance Unit hangar Jun. 17, 2022 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Lt. Col. Gary “Nordo” North utilized this jet to eliminate an enemy MiG-25 Foxbat during Operation Southern Watch. It is the first American F-16 to earn an aerial victory.

As we have already explained, Nordo called for a tactical offset to the north to “bracket” the F-16s between the MiG and the thirty-second parallel, creating a blocking maneuver and trapping the Iraqi fighter in forbidden airspace. The MiG could not escape back into Iraqi territory without a fight. “Someone was going to die within the next two minutes, and it wasn’t going to be me or my wingman,” North said.

North requested clearance to fire as he visually identified the aircraft-a MiG-25 Foxbat armed with AA-6 “Acrid” radar guided missiles. He directed his wingman to employ his electronic jamming pod and again he requested clearance to fire. He finally heard “BANDIT-BANDIT-BANDIT, CLEARED TO KILL” over his head set. At approximately three nautical miles, at fifteen degrees nose high and fifteen degrees right bank North locked up the MiG-25 and fired an AIM-120 AMRAAM (Advanced Medium Range Anti-Aircraft Missile), which guided to impact and totally destroyed the Russian built Foxbat.

First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War
An F-16D Fighting Falcon sits on display during an unveiling ceremony at the 310th Air Maintenance Unit hangar Jun. 17, 2022, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The names of the corrosion control team members responsible for painting the jet can be seen in the lower right corner of the photo. The corrosion control team’s responsibilities revolve around preventative maintenance in an effort to prevent or control corrosion, supporting aircraft generation and pilot training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Caleb F. Butler)

This engagement not only marked the first aerial victory scored by an American F-16, but also the first kill for the AIM-120 AMRAAM.

The paint scheme for this jet was accomplished by 12 Fabrication Flight Airmen assigned to corrosion control here at Luke AFB, as a means of honoring North’s actions and Air Force heritage. The paint job required 1,500 man-hours and over 13 gallons of paint.

First American F-16 MiG killer gets Desert Camouflage paint scheme similar to that of the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War
A bay door of an F-16D Fighting Falcon sits ajar during an unveiling ceremony at the 310th Air Maintenance Unit hangar Jun. 17, 2022, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Lt. Col. Gary “Nordo” North utilized this jet to eliminate an enemy MiG-25 Foxbat during Operation Southern Watch. It is the first American F-16 to earn an aerial victory.

“This ‘What if’ design pulls cues from the Desert Camouflage Uniform worn during the first Gulf War, and a similar experimental livery of camouflage that was tested at that time,” said Staff Sgt. Michael Cichonsky, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron F-35 low observable aircraft structural maintainer. “Very few pictures exist of the test scheme, since it was hand rolled using latex paint, and only lasted a week before being removed. With this design, we not only pay homage to the history of General North and 0778, but it also allows us to reimagine if this paint scheme was selected for use during Operation Southern Watch.”

Photo credit: Senior Airman Caleb F. Butler / U.S. Air Force

F-16 MiG Killer print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. F-16D Fighting Falcon 56th FW, 310th FS, LF/90-0778 / 2018

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Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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