We use cookies to optimize our website and our services. Refer here for privacy statement. Here for Cookie policy.

Female fighter pilots test G-suit modified to fit women pilots

First Lt. Elizabeth Pennell, T-38 pilot, steps into an F-16D Fighting Falcon while testing a modified version of the Advanced Technology Anti-Gravity Suit.

Five female fighter pilots tested a modified version of the Advanced Technology Anti-Gravity Suit.

Five female fighter pilots tested a modified version of the Advanced Technology Anti-Gravity Suit (ATAGS) at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB) Oct. 26-30.

ATAGS is a proven design and a critical life support item that protects aircrew members from the effects of high-G forces during maneuvers in fighter aircraft, but the ATAGS design, which has been in use since 2001, was developed primarily for standard men’s body types. Pilots who are shorter or have smaller or hard-to-fit body types often struggle to properly adjust the G-suit to fit well due to a limited range of adjustability in the standard sizes.

As explained by 1st Lt. Savanah Bray, 53rd Wing, in the article Female fighter pilots test modified ATAGS “G-suit”, directly tasked by the secretary of the Air Force, engineers and subject matter experts at Air Force Life Cycle Management Center and AFWERX set out to address priority shortfalls in female specific aircrew equipment and gear, to include ATAGS. Instead of creating a new product altogether, experts determined modifications could be made to the current ATAGS design to better fit women and various body types.

The two major modifications to the ATAGS include wider lacing panels in the waist, thigh and calf, which allows the suit to be easily adjusted for different body proportions, and the option for a “darted” or tailored, custom waist that does not reduce performance of the waist bladder that inflates during high-G maneuvers.

“In the past, some pilots with a shorter torso have had issues with ATAGS that were too large riding up and causing bruising on the rib cages, while pilots who are hard-to-fit may have had one size that fits through the legs, but need a smaller size in the waist,” said Charles Cruze, an AFLCMC Human Systems Division engineer. “Now, the waist can be darted up to 3.75 inches, allowing for a more custom and accurate fit, preventing both of those issues.”

Five fighter pilots from various squadrons wear a modified version of the Advanced Technology Anti-Gravity Suit.

To properly and safely test the ATAGS, the 85th Test and Evaluation Squadron executed nearly 20 sorties in F-16 D-model aircraft. During these test sorties, pilots conducted low- and high-G basic fighter maneuvers and specific profiles to allow for accurate evaluation of the modified ATAGS. F-16 D-models were used so that in each sortie, a pilot wearing standard ATAGS was in the aircraft to ensure safety should an issue with the modified ATAGS arise.

“For the purpose of this test, five pilots and one aircrew member tested the modified ATAGS, and evaluated it based on comfort and performance when compared to the normal ATAGS typically worn,” said Sharon Rogers, 46th Test Squadron lead test engineer. “Pilots were asked to evaluate based on not only the ATAGS during high-G maneuvers, but also during regular activities like sitting, standing, walking and climbing into and out of the aircraft.”

“As more women strap into fast jets to get the mission done, I think the Air Force is heading in the right direction,” said Capt. Brittany Trimble, an F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, when asked about her experience testing the modified ATAGS.

The pilots and aircrew who tested the ATAGS noticed significant improvements in comfort and functionality in the modified ATAGS.

“I definitely noticed improvement with the new updates and the darted waist in particular,” Trimble said. “I honestly didn’t expect to notice much of a difference because I’d never noticed significant issues with the ATAGS sizes before, but I was pleasantly surprised that these upgrades increased the ATAGS functionality significantly under G.”

Following the flight testing, the 46th Test Squadron will provide a test report, explained Rogers. Under the current acquisition strategy, the modified ATAGS could be in the hands of fighter pilots and aircrew who need it within 12-24 months.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. F-16D Fighting Falcon 19th Air Force, 56th Fighter Wing, 310th Fighter Squadron “Tophats”, LF/88-0175 – Luke AFB, AZ – 2011

Photo credit: 1st Lt. Savanah Bray / U.S. Air Force

Related posts

USAF seeks companies able to provide commercial derivative tanker aircraft to supplement its tanker aircraft fleet at the end of KC-46A production

Eastern Air Defense Sector takes group photo with F-16 #89-114, one of the jets that responded to 9/11 terror attacks

Thanks to its unique thrust reverser the Saab 37 Viggen could land, come to a full stop, perform a Y-turn on the runway and take off in the opposite direction

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Read More