Exclusive: The Story of how Iconic SR-71 Blackbird’s Habu Logo was Conceived

Exclusive: The Story of how Iconic SR-71 Blackbird’s Habu Logo was Conceived

By Russ Maheras
Jan 26 2020
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“Working almost daily on the SR-71 was quite the inspiration, and in 1986, I decided to finally draw a poster of this amazing aircraft,” Master Sgt. Russ Maheras, US Air Force (Retired)

I started drawing comics in the late 1960s, and made my first professional sale in 1974. Originally, I planned on making comics a career, and throughout most of the 1970s I had a variety of blue collar “day jobs” while I learned my craft and honed my drawing skills.

Exclusive: The Story of how Iconic SR-71 Blackbird’s Habu Logo was Conceived
Me in uniform in 1986 standing in from of a piece of door art I painted for my Electronic Warfare Systems (EWS) Shop at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, around the same time I created the Habu poster. It depicts “Super Crow,” which is a modified version I created of the long-time “Black Crow” mascot of the EWS community at large.

However, as 1978 came to a close, and I learned how difficult life was for the typical freelance artist, it became clear to me that I needed to find a different career path to support myself and grow as a person. So in 1978, I joined the U.S. Air Force to learn electronics and become an aircraft electronic warfare systems (EWS) technician.

SR-71 Model
This model is available from AirModels – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS.

After my initial training was completed, I was assigned to RAF Bentwaters in England to work on the then brand-new A-10 Warthog. From there I was reassigned to Beale Air Force Base, Calif., where I worked on EWS equipment for both the U-2 Dragon Lady and the SR-71 Blackbird.

SR-71 Print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. SR-71A Blackbird 61-7972 “Skunkworks”

In 1985, I was reassigned to Detachment 1, 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, the highly decorated SR-71 unit strategically located at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. My artistic skills were regularly utilized at every assigned unit, and Det. 1 was no exception.

Exclusive: The Story of how Iconic SR-71 Blackbird’s Habu Logo was Conceived
SR-71 Blackbird #974 Ichi Ban in formation with a T-38 Chase Plane

During my tour there, I drew a variety of official and unofficial Blackbird-related illustrations for leadership, peers, and myself. Working almost daily on the SR-71 was quite the inspiration, and in 1986, I decided to finally draw a poster of this amazing aircraft, which Okinawans had long ago nicknamed “Habu” because its color and distinctive chines reminded them of a poisonous cobra on the island of the same name.

Exclusive: The Story of how Iconic SR-71 Blackbird’s Habu Logo was Conceived
Original Habu poster

I hope you enjoy the image as much as my peers did back in 1986, when the mighty Mach 3+ Blackbird still ruled the Pacific skies. As for drawing, I’ve never stopped, and I still regularly create new material to this very day.

Photo credit: Master Sgt. Russ Maheras, US Air Force (Retired) and Tech. Sgt. Michael Haggerty / U. S. Air Force


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Russ Maheras

Russ Maheras

Russ Maheras has always read comic books and comic strips. A self-taught artist his art appeared in fan publications such as "The Buyer's Guide for Comic Fandom." In 1978 he joined the Air Force to learn electronics. He worked on ECM/electronic warfare equipment on A-10, SR-71, U-2, RC-135 and C-5 aircraft. During the 20 years of his Air Force career, he continued to draw and generated a large body of artwork. He retired in 1998 and he still draws whenever he has the chance.

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