Did you know the US Navy Blue Angels were named after a nightclub in New York by the original team in 1946?

Did you know the US Navy Blue Angels were named after a nightclub in New York by the original team in 1946?

By Dario Leone
Apr 26 2021
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“The Blue Angel nightclub was a big thing in its day. I think it took up a whole block. Four orchestras, eight or nine bars, it was massive. I said, ‘Gee, that sounds great! The Blue Angels. Navy, Blue, and Flying!,” Lt. Cmdr. Roy “Butch” Voris, first Blue Angels Leader.

At the end of World War II, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Chester W. Nimitz ordered the formation of a flight demonstration team to keep the public interested in naval aviation.

In a short three months, the Navy Flight Exhibition Team performed its first flight demonstration Jun. 15, 1946, at their home base, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Florida. Lt. Cmdr. Roy “Butch” Voris led the team and flew the Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat.

According to the official website of the US Navy Blue Angels, the new Navy Flight Exhibition team was only the second formal flying demonstration team to have been created in the world, since the Patrouille de France formed in 1931.

But let’s face it, “The Flight Exhibition Team” is not a very catchy name. As told by Nicholas A. Veronico in his book The Blue Angels a Fly-By Hitory, to find a new name, the team ran a contest throughout the training command. “We were getting hundreds of names back, but not a one grabbed us like we wanted to be grabbed:’ Voris said. “I got a call to go up to the staff, this time to meet with the chief of staff, Captain Bill Ginter. He asked how the name contest was coming. I told him that we were just not finding anything right yet, but that I was sure we would get something soon. Ginter told me he had one for me to consider, the Navy’s Blue Lancers. Something rung a bell—I remembered that his son had submitted this one. I said, ‘Yeah, it’s got a ring to it, hasn’t it Captain?’ He asked me to give it serious thought, and I knew what he meant.

“We were going to go to New York for a show and Wickendoll, who was my number two man, was looking through the New Yorker magazine,” Voris recalled. We were sitting having a scotch in my room at the BOQ and he said, ‘I’ve got it boss. I asked what he meant. He was looking at a column called Goings On About Town and the nightclubs are all listed. The Blue Angel nightclub was a big thing in its day. I think it took up a whole block. Four orchestras, eight or nine bars, it was massive. I said, ‘Gee, that sounds great! The Blue Angels. Navy, Blue, and Flying!”

Did you know the US Navy Blue Angels were named after a nightclub in New York by the original team in 1946?
A Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat of the U.S. Navy flight demonstration team Blue Angels in 1946.

When they arrived at Omaha, Nebraska, for the air show in July 1946, they told the aviation press of their Blue Lancers versus Blue Angels dilemma. The press agreed to help. After the show, headlines touted the team’s performance with Blue Angels in quotes.

“When I got back to Jacksonville with the team, I was summoned up to Ginter’s office. Dispatches had come in congratulating the command on the performance of the team. Ginter asked, ‘What’s this Blue Angel stuff?’ I told him I did not know and that l had heard some comment, from somebody in the press, saying they are just like Blue Angels:’ Voris said. Captain Ginter knew he had been hoodwinked, but there was nothing he could do.

In the 1940’s, the team thrilled audiences with precision combat maneuvers in the F6 Hellcat, the F8 Bearcat and the F9 Panther. During the 1950’s, they refined their demonstration with aerobatic maneuvers in the F9 Cougar and F-11 Tiger and introduced the first six-plane delta formation, still flown to this day. By the end of the 1960’s, the Blue Angels were flying the F-4 Phantom, the only two seat aircraft flown by the delta formation. In 1974, the team transitioned to the A-4 Skyhawk, a smaller and lighter aircraft with a tighter turning radius allowing for a more dynamic flight demonstration. In 1986, they transitioned to the F/A-18 Hornet, and on Nov. 4, 2020 the Blue Angels officially transitioned to the F/A-18 Super Hornet.

For more interesting news and info about US Navy Blue Angels and other display teams check out Aerobatic Display Teams website

Did you know the US Navy Blue Angels were named after a nightclub in New York by the original team in 1946?
Drawing showing the different aircraft flown by the U.S. Navy “Blue Angels” aerobatics team from 1946 to 2020 (top to bottom): Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat: June–August 1946 Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat: August 1946 – 1949 Grumman F9F-2 Panther: 1949 – June 1950; F9F-5 Panther: 1951 – Winter 1954/55 Grumman F9F-8 Cougar: Winter 1954/55 – mid-season 1957 Grumman F11F-1 (F-11A) Tiger: mid-season 1957 – 1969 McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II: 1969 – December 1974 Douglas A-4F Skyhawk: December 1974 – November 1986 McDonnell Douglas F/A-18A/C Hornet: November 1986 – November 2020

Photo credit: U.S. Navy


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Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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