We use cookies to optimize our website and our services. Refer here for privacy statement. Here for Cookie policy.

Did you know that titanium used to build the iconic SR-71 Blackbird Mach 3+ spy plane came from Soviet Union?

The world’s largest supplier of it was the Soviet Union. The US worked through Third World countries and fake companies and finally was able to ship the ore to the US to build the SR-71 Blackbird.

The SR-71, unofficially known as the “Blackbird,” was a long-range, Mach 3+, strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft.

The first flight of an SR-71 took place on Dec. 22, 1964, and the first SR-71 to enter service was delivered to the 4200th (later 9th) Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., in January 1966.

The Blackbird was in a different category from anything that had come before. “Everything had to be invented. Everything,” Skunk Works legendary aircraft designer Kelly Johnson recalled in an interesting article appeared on Lockheed Martin website.

The speed of the SR-71 exceeded 2,000 mph. Other planes of the era could, in theory, approximate that speed but only in short, after-burner-driven bursts. The Blackbird maintained a record-setting speed for hours at a time. At such velocity, friction with the atmosphere generates temperatures that would melt the conventional airframe.

With temperatures on the aircraft’s leading edges exceeding 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, dealing with the heat raised a host of seemingly insurmountable design and material challenges. Titanium alloy was the only option for the airframe —providing the strength of stainless steel, a relatively light weight, and durability at the excessive temperatures.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. SR-71A Blackbird 61-7972 “Skunkworks”

Titanium, however, proved to be a particularly sensitive material from which to build an airplane. The brittle alloy shattered if mishandled, which meant great frustration on the Skunk Works assembly line, and new training classes for Lockheed’s machinists. Conventional cadmium-plated steel tools, it was soon learned, embrittled the titanium on contact; so new tools were designed and fabricated—out of titanium.

But most important the US did not have the necessary ore. The world’s largest supplier of it was the Soviet Union, America’s enemy during the Cold War. The US worked through Third World countries and fake companies and finally was able to ship the ore to the US to build the SR-71.

“The airplane is 92% titanium inside and out. Back when they were building the airplane the United States didn’t have the ore supplies – an ore called rutile ore. It’s a very sandy soil and it’s only found in very few parts of the world. The major supplier of the ore was the USSR. Working through Third World countries and bogus operations, they were able to get the rutile ore shipped to the United States to build the SR-71,” famous former SR-71 pilot Colonel Rich Graham said in an interesting article appeared on BBC.

So, also thanks to the accidental help of the Soviet Union, throughout its nearly 24-year career, the Blackbird remained the world’s fastest and highest-flying operational aircraft. From 80,000 feet, it could survey 100,000 square miles of Earth’s surface per hour.

During its operational lifetime, the SR-71 provided intelligence about the Yom Kippur War in 1973, the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982, the American air forces raid on Libya in 1986 and the revelation of Iranian Silkworm missile batteries in 1987. The US Air Force retired its fleet of SR-71s on Jan. 26, 1990, because of a decreasing defense budget and high costs of operation.

This model is available from AirModels – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS.

Photo credit: Judson Brohmer / U.S. Air Force

Related posts

Dale “Snort” Snodgrass, legendary US Navy F-14 Tomcat pilot, killed in in the crash of a SIAI-Marchetti SM.1019

In 1971 an SR-71 crew flew 15,000 miles, in 10 hours 30 minutes non-stop, in full continuous AB to see how many times the Blackbird could refuel before the liquid nitrogen gave out

Here’s why a terrain-masked attack helicopter is safe against missiles but not against tube artillery

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Read More