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Cool video highlights USAF strategic bombers capabilities

The threat of using strategic bombers can be enough to change the enemy’s mind

With the ability to carry almost any weapon the U.S. Air Force (USAF) has to offer, strategic bombers are a mainstay in the U.S. arsenal. Just the threat of using one can be enough to change the enemy’s mind. By watching the video in this post you’ll find out how the USAF uses strategic bombers for more than just delivering weapons.

Noteworthy the USAF recently announced that will bed down the B-21 Raider next generation bomber at Dyess Air Force Base (AFB), Texas; Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota; and Whiteman AFB, Missouri.

“We are designing the B-21 Raider to replace our aging bombers as a long-range, highly-survivable aircraft capable of carrying mixed conventional and nuclear payloads, to strike any target worldwide,” said Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David L. Goldfein.

Although the first B-21s are expected in the mid-2020s, the Air Force doesn’t plan to retire the existing strategic bombers until there are sufficient B-21s to replace them.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. B-1B Lancer 28th FW, 34th BS Thunderbirds, EL/86-129 / 2005

The B-21 Raider will play a crucial role in allowing USAF to operate in tomorrow’s high end threat environment, and in providing the service the flexibility and capability to launch from the continental U.S. and deliver air strikes on any location in the world.

Once ready, the first prototype of the B-21 will be the first manned aircraft built by Northrop Grumman since the company B-2 bomber which was developed in the 1980s.

The Raider will join the fleet of B-52H Stratofortresses and will replace B-1B Lancer and B-2 Spirit bomber aircraft.

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com

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