A BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL PHOTO OF THE FIRST F-15E STRIKE EAGLE

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The F-15E was a modification of the two-seat F-15 Eagle and was designed as an all-weather multirole strike fighter

The interesting photo in this post features the first McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F-15E Strike Eagle which from Mar. 2, 1987 was used at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) for Developmental Test & Evaluation (DT&E).

The F-15E was a modification of the two-seat F-15 Eagle and was designed as an all-weather multirole strike fighter with a back seat for a second crew member to operate a ground attack weapons delivery system. The cockpit contains the latest advanced avionics, controls and displays. The redesigned airframe was built with a stronger structure allowing heavier takeoff weights and doubled the original F-15 Eagle’s service life.

The first production model of the F-15E was delivered to the 405th Tactical Training Wing, Luke AFB, Ariz., in April 1988.

The F-15E is powered by two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 or 229 engines that incorporate advanced digital technology for improved performance. For example, with a digital electronic engine control system, F-15E pilots can accelerate from idle power to maximum afterburner in less than four seconds, a 40 percent improvement over the previous engine control system. Faster engine acceleration means quicker takeoffs and crisper response while maneuvering. The F100-PW-220 engines can produce 50,000 pounds of thrust (25,000 each) and the F100-PW-229 engines 58,000 pounds of thrust (29,000 each).

Each of the low-drag conformal fuel tanks that hug the F-15E’s fuselage can carry 750 gallons of fuel. The tanks hold weapons on short pylons rather than conventional weapon racks, reducing drag and further extending the range of the Strike Eagle.

This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. F-15E Strike Eagle 366th Fighter Wing, 391st Fighter Squadron, MO/90-0249 – Mountain Home AFB, ID – Tiger Meet of the Americas 2008 –

Photo credit: Edwards History Office file photo / U.S. Air Force

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com

Source: U.S. Air Force