"Each Army National Guard Apache battalion needs to borrow six AH-64s to go to war," NGAUS president says

“EACH ARMY NATIONAL GUARD APACHE BATTALION NEEDS TO BORROW SIX AH-64s TO GO TO WAR,” NGAUS PRESIDENT SAYS

By Dario Leone
Jan 14 2018
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With fewer AH-64 Apache attack helicopters, each battalion “will never have enough aircraft to train the way they are supposed to fight,” Retired Brig. Gen. Roy Robinson, NGAUS president

National Guard Association of the U.S. (NGAUS) has issued a statement regarding the Army’s recent announcement to keep four AH-64 Apache attack helicopter battalions within the Army National Guard (the battalions will be in North Carolina, South Carolina and Utah with a battalion split between Texas and Mississippi).

“Unfortunately, that recommendation was made two years ago—in a very different environment,” Retired Brig. Gen. Roy Robinson, the NGAUS president, said.

“Today’s quickly emerging threats make readiness paramount, and 18 aircraft are six fewer than an Apache battalion needs to deploy. This means Guard Apache battalions will never have enough aircraft to train the way they are supposed to fight. And each would have to borrow six aircraft to go to war,” Robinson added.

“In addition, as the House of Representatives noted in the fiscal 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, the active-component Army has a serious Apache pilot shortage that wasn’t foreseen two years ago. The Guard currently has six Apache battalions. The decision to keep just four effectively cuts two battalions of Apache pilots when the Army and the nation urgently need them.

“We know this largely was a dollar-driven action. NGAUS stands ready to work with Army leaders and Congress to find the money to build the attack-helicopter force the Army and the nation need in an increasingly troubled world.”

The AH-64 Apache is the world’s most advanced multi-role combat helicopter and is used by the U.S. Army and a growing number of international defense forces. Boeing has delivered more than 2,200 Apaches to customers around the world since the aircraft entered production. The U.S. Army Apache fleet has accumulated (as of July 2016) more than 4.2 million flight hours since the first AH-64A was delivered to the U.S. Army in January 1984.

AH-64 Print
This print is available in multiple sizes from AircraftProfilePrints.com – CLICK HERE TO GET YOURS. AH-64D “Longbow Apache” Serial No.99-5135, Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, Iraq, March 2003.

Photo credit: Tech. Sgt. Andy Dunaway / U.S. Army

Artwork courtesy of AircraftProfilePrints.com


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Dario Leone

Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

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